TWCP Physics Calendar

Nuclear spins control current in plastic LED: Step toward quantum computing, spintronic memory, better displays

University of Utah physicists read the subatomic "spins" in the centers or nuclei of hydrogen isotopes, and used the data to control current that powered light in a cheap, plastic LED – at room temperature and without strong magnetic fields.

CERN and the American Physical Society announce partnership for open access

The American Physical Society (APS) and The European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) jointly announce a partnership to make all CERN-authored articles published in the APS journal collection to be Open Access. Articles in APS' Physical Review Letters, Physical Review D, and Physical Review C in 2015 and 2016 will be covered by this agreement. All physics results from CERN will benefit from this partnership, in theoretical physics and experimental physics, at the LHC accelerator as well as other experimental programs.

Physics team uses pixel sensitivity of smartphone as a random generator for encryption

(Phys.org) —A team of physicists led by Bruno Sanguinetti of the University of Geneva has found a way to use an ordinary smartphone as a true random number generator to provide secure communications. In their paper uploaded to the arXiv preprint server (soon to be published in Physical Review X), the team describes how they used the photon sensitivity of a Nokia N9 smartphone camera lens to generate truly random numbers that could be used in encryption schemes.

Calibrating cancer radiotherapy beams using light and sound

Doctors shrink tumors with radiation therapy, but a badly calibrated beam can cause serious complications. Scientists in NIST's Radiation Physics Division in the Physical Measurement Laboratory (PML) are developing a new set of techniques that could someday take the place of current standards. Their proof-of-concept work demonstrates a potentially better way to calibrate a radiotherapy beam by measuring subtle changes in the temperature of a phantom, or proxy for a person, using ultrasound or optical light.

Researchers observe a new kind of disbandment in the atomic nuclei rich in protons

An experiment led by researchers Sonja Orrigo and Berta Rubio, from the Grupo de Espectroscopia Gamma de l'Institut de Física Corpuscular IFIC (centre that belongs to the University of Valencia and the CSIC) observed an exotic disbandment mode in the beta disbandment of the 56Zn. The results dicovered by an international team in the Ganil Lab (France) have been published in Physical Review Letters.

NASA's 2015 Sample Return Robot Challenge Open for Registration

Registration is open for the fourth running of the NASA Centennial Challenge program's Sample Return Robot Challenge, which will take place June 8-13, 2015. The autonomous robot competition, which carries a prize purse of $1.5 million, will be held at Worcester Polytechnic Institute in Worcester, Massachusetts, which has hosted the event since 2012.

NASA's 2015 Sample Return Robot Challenge Open for Registration

Registration is open for the fourth running of the NASA Centennial Challenge program's Sample Return Robot Challenge, which will take place June 8-13, 2015. The autonomous robot competition, which carries a prize purse of $1.5 million, will be held at Worcester Polytechnic Institute in Worcester, Massachusetts, which has hosted the event since 2012.

NASA Television Coverage Set for Next Space Station Crew Launch

NASA Television will provide extensive coverage of the Sept. 25 launch from Kazakhstan of three crew members of Expedition 41/42, as they begin their planned six-hour journey to the International Space Station. NASA Television coverage will start at 3:30 p.m. EDT and will include video of the pre-launch activities leading up to spacecraft boarding.

Magnetic neural control with nanoparticles

Magnetic nanoparticles don't have to be "one size fits all." Instead, individual magnetic nanoparticles can be tailored in an array of differing sizes and compositions to allow for heating them separately by varying the frequency and amplitude of an external alternating magnetic field, MIT graduate student Michael G. Christiansen and colleagues show in a recent Applied Physics Letters paper.

The curious case of the fluctuating speed of light

Suppose you were an electrician. You've trained, apprenticed, passed all your certifications, and you've worked with electric wiring for years. You've wired houses and commercial buildings for years, and you feel pretty confident in your trade. One day you finish wiring a light switch, dust off your hands, and flip the switch to test it. But instead of seeing the light turn right on, you find that it flickers dimly. You're pretty sure you wired things correctly, so what do you do?

Pages

Subscribe to TWCP Physics RSS