TWCP Physics Calendar

Mobile imager of fast neutrons spots radiation source at a distance and through shielding

A nuclear device has been hidden in a high-rise building in a major metropolitan area. Emergency responders have intelligence that narrows down the location to a single city block, but it isn't safe to search door-to-door. Can they identify the exact location of the device quickly without the culprits realizing a search is on?

New world record for a neutron scattering magnet

A unique magnet developed by the Florida State University-headquartered National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (MagLab) and Germany's Helmholtz Centre Berlin (HZB) has reached a new world record for a neutron scattering magnet.

The Future of Timekeeping Rests With Quantum Mechanics

A proposed quantum clock network would be so accurate it could detect continental shifts, potentially detecting an earthquake.

The science of charismatic voices

When a right-wing Italian politician named Umberto Bossi suffered a severe stroke in 2004, his speech became permanently impaired. Strangely, this change impacted Bossi's perception among his party's followers—from appearing authoritarian to benevolent.

Urban seismic network detects human sounds

When listening to the Earth, what clues can seismic data reveal about the impact of urban life? Although naturally occurring vibrations have proven extremely useful to seismologists, until now the vibrations caused by humans haven't been explored in any real depth.

NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility Completes Initial Assessment after Orbital Launch Mishap

The Wallops Incident Response Team completed today an initial assessment of Wallops Island, Virginia, following the catastrophic failure of Orbital Science Corp.’s Antares rocket shortly after liftoff at 6:22 p.m. EDT Tuesday, Oct. 28, from Pad 0A of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport at NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia.

Research team develops aerosol optical tweezers

A device which allows users to hold airborne particles – aerosols – for extended periods has been developed by a team at the University of Bristol and Portishead-based firm Biral.

Can the wave function of an electron be divided and trapped?

Electrons are elementary particles -- indivisible, unbreakable. But new research suggests the electron's quantum state -- the electron wave function -- can be separated into many parts. That has some strange implications for the theory of quantum mechanics.

Can the wave function of an electron be divided and trapped?

New research by physicists from Brown University puts the profound strangeness of quantum mechanics in a nutshell—or, more accurately, in a helium bubble.

Ancient auditory illusions reflected in prehistoric art?

Some of mankind's earliest and most mysterious artistic achievements—including prehistoric cave paintings, canyon petroglyphs and megalithic structures such as Stonehenge—may have been inspired by the behaviors of sound waves being misinterpreted as "supernatural."

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